Home » Clinical Times » Nutrition

Nutrition

Whole grain lowers risk of chronic diseases

A higher intake of whole grain foods is associated with reduced risk of major chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as lower risk of death from a range of diseases, show findings published by The BMJ.

2.1 billion around the world now overweight or obese

Worldwide, there has been a startling increase in rates of obesity and overweight in both adults (28 per cent increase) and children (up by 47 per cent) in the past 33 years, with the number of overweight and obese people rising from 857 million in 1980 to 2.

Food packaging chemicals may be harmful to health

The synthetic chemicals used in the packaging, storage, and processing of foodstuffs might be harmful to human health over the long term, warned environmental scientists in a commentary in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Daily iron can improve birth weight

Taking iron daily during pregnancy is associated with a significant increase in birth weight and a reduction in risk of low birth weight, finds a study published recently on bmj.

Protective effect of vitamin A against IBD

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have made novel discoveries around the protective influence of vitamin A against the damaging immune responses that lead to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Vegetarian diets associated with lower risk of death

Vegetarian diets are associated with reduced death rates in a study of more than 70,000 Seventh-day Adventists, with more favourable results for men than women, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Further research backs the benefits of Mediterranean diet

A Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events among persons at high cardiovascular risk, new research in the New England Journal of Medicine has found.

End doctor prescriptions of gluten-free foods — DTB

The time has come for doctors to stop prescribing gluten-free foods to patients with coeliac disease and for the NHS to find a better way to support patients, says an editorial in the independent review of medical treatment, the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB).